Lyme Disease Symptoms

 

lyme bullseye rash

There is no complete list of Lyme disease symptoms since scientists are finding new ones all the time. We have attempted to list the most common symptoms here for you.

List of Lyme Disease Symptoms

Every organ and organ system can be affected, here’s a list of some of the Lyme disease symptoms as they relate to specific areas of the body:

  • Head – headache, neck pain, facial pain and paralysis, difficulty chewing, pain in teeth, dry mouth, loss of taste/smell, numb tongue/mouth. Peculiar metallic or salty taste is also common in Lyme Disease.
  • Bladder — frequent or painful urination, repeated urinary tract infections, irritable bladder, interstitial cystitis.
  • Lung — respiratory infection, cough, asthma, pneumonia, pleurisy, chest pains
  • Ear — pain, hearing loss, ringing (tinnitus), sensitivity to noise, dizziness & equilibrium disorders.
  • Eyes — pain due to inflammation (sclerotic, uveitis, optic neuritis), dry eyes, sensitivity to light, drooping of eyelid (ptosis), conjunctivitis, blurry or double vision, swelling around eyes / bags below the eyes.
  • Throat — sore throat, swollen glands, cough, hoarseness, difficulty swallowing
  • Neurological — headaches, facial paralysis, seizures, meningitis, stiff neck, burning, tingling, or prickling sensations (parenthesis), loss of reflexes, loss of coordination, equilibrium problems/dizziness (these symptoms mimic an MS, ALS, or Parkinson’s like syndrome)
  • Stomach — pain, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, anorexia
  • Heart — weakness, dizziness, irregular heart-beat, myocarditis, pericarditis, palpitations, heart block, enlarged heart, fainting, shortness of breath, chest pain, mitral valve prolapse.
  • Muscle & skeletal system — arthralgias (joint pain), fibromyalgia (muscle inflammation and pain)
  • Other Organs — liver infection / hepatitis, elevated liver enzymes, enlarged spleen, swollen testicles, and irregular or ceased menses.
  • Neuropsychiatric — mood swings, irritability, anxiety, rage (Lyme rage), poor concentration, cognitive loss, memory loss, loss of appetite, mental deterioration, depression, disorientation, insomnia
  • Pregnancy — miscarriage, premature birth, birth defects, stillbirth
  • Skin – EM, single or multiple rash, hives, ACA

These Lyme disease symptoms are not diagnostic, except for a bulls-eye EM rash. A diagnosis for Lyme disease is a clinical one and must be made by a physician experienced in recognizing Lyme Disease symptoms and history, experienced in interpreting lab results and recognizing a response to treatment. Always remember that negative serological tests are not reliable and cannot be used solely for a diagnosis. These tests frequently are incorrectly negative or positive.

Lyme disease Co-Infections

Co-infections Vector Causative Agent Endemic Area Symptoms
Lyme Disease Deer Tick
Pacific
Black-legged Tick
Borrelia burgdorferi
Borrelia lonsestari
Northeast
Midwest
West Coast
Off season flu
Rash (bull’s-eye or other)
Constitutional symptoms
Musculoskeletal symptoms
Wide range of neurological
symptoms, including Bell’s Palsy
Ehrlichiosis Deer Tick
Pacific
Black-legged tick
American Dog Tick
Long Star Tick
Ehrlichia
phagocytohphila
Northeast
Upper Midwest
Fever
Headache
Constitutional symptoms
Possible death
Colorado Tick Fever Rocky Mountain Wood Tick Colorado Tick
Fever Virus
Western US Fever with remission
Second bout of fever
Tick Relapsing Fever Relapsing fever tick (Ornithodoros turicata) Borrelia hermsii Western US Periods of fever
Petechial rashes
Q Fever Brown Dog Tick
Rocky Mountain Wood Tick
Lone Star Tick
Coxiella burnetii Throughout US Acute fever
Chills
Sweats
Powassan Viral Encephalitis Woodchuck Tick Flavivirus Eastern and Western US Fever
Meningoencephalitis
10% fatality rate
50% Neurological sequela
Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever American Dog Tick
Rocky Mountain Wood Tick
Rickettsia Throughout US Sudden fever Maculopapular
rash on soles of hands and
feet that spreads over the
entire body 3%-5% fatality rate
Tick Paralysis American Dog Tick
Rocky Mountain Wood Tick
Lone Star Tick
Neurotoxin excreted
from tick’s
salivary gland
Throughout US Fatigue
Flacid paralysis
Tongue and facial paralysis
Convulsions
Death
Tularemia American Dog Tick
Rocky Mountain Wood Tick
Lone Star Tick
  Throughout US Indolent ulcers
Swollen lymph nodes
Deaths can occur
Bartonella Cats
Ticks
Fleas
 Bartonella Quintana
Bartonella henselea
Worldwide  

What are the symptoms of Lyme Disease in dogs?

The symptoms of Lyme disease in dogs differ from those in people, and usually occur much later after the tick bite. Clinical illness in dogs usually occurs 2 to 5 months after a bite from an infected tick. Cats can develop Lyme disease, but it occurs rarely in them, even in endemic areas. Other domestic animals such as horses have contracted Lyme disease, but it does not appear to be a significant problem. Dogs show several different forms of the disease, but by far, the most common symptoms are a fever of between 103 and 105°, lameness, swelling in the joints, swollen lymph nodes, lethargy, and loss of appetite.

General Health and prevention for Dogs

Depending upon the weight of your pet, we offer the following guidelines:

2 – 20 pounds: 3 drops a day
20 – 40 pounds: 5 drops a day
40 – 70 pounds: 6 drops a day
Over 70 pounds: 7 drops a day
It is best to place the drops directly on their food.

Look, if you are lost or confused or just simply want some love or support, call our toll-free number and get your free consultation.This is not about selling you a product, it is about supporting you and your healing process.

1-888-240-2326 option #2 PST Ask for what you need. We really care.

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