Are You at Risk of Acquiring MRSA Super-bug Infections? Here is What the CDC Says

Definition of MRSA by the CDC

colorized scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of MRSA

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) is a type of staph bacteria that is resistant to certain antibiotics called beta-lactams. These antibiotics include methicillin and other more common antibiotics such as oxacillin, penicillin, and amoxicillin. In the community, most MRSA infections are skin infections. More severe or potentially life-threatening MRSA infections occur most frequently among patients in healthcare settings. While 25% to 30% of people are colonized* in the nose with staph, less than 2% are colonized with MRSA (Gorwitz RJ et al. Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2008:197:1226-34.).

*Colonized:
When a person carries the organism/bacteria but shows no clinical signs or symptoms of infection. For Staph aureus the most common body site colonized is the nose.

MRSA infections can occur in any geographic location and anywhere on a person’s body and can affect anyone. Historically, MRSA infections occurred in hospitalized patients, but now these infections are common in the community. The biggest risk factor for MRSA infection is open or broken skin (such as a wound or surgical site); however, MRSA infections can occur even on areas of the skin where there is no obvious wound or break in the skin.

Patients in Healthcare Settings

Patients in healthcare facilities have weakened immune systems and undergo procedures (such as surgery) or have catheters inserted into the skin that make it easier for MRSA to get into the body. It is for this reason that healthcare personnel must follow infection control procedures (such as hand hygiene and proper catheter care) to prevent patients from acquiring MRSA infections. When patients get MRSA in healthcare facilities, the infections tend to be severe. Common infections include surgical wound infections, urinary tract infections, bloodstream infections, and pneumonia.

Visitors of Infected Patients

When visiting MRSA patients, individuals should follow the facility’s visitor policies. Casual contact—such as kissing, hugging, and touching—is usually acceptable. Visitors should avoid touching catheters or wound sites and should wash their hands before leaving an infected person’s room.

Skin Infections in the Community

MRSA in the community is widespread and therefore, anyone is at risk. Most people who get MRSA in the community get infections of the skin. Factors that have been associated with the spread of MRSA skin infections include: close skin-to-skin contact, openings in the skin such as cuts or abrasions, contaminated items and surfaces, crowded living conditions, and poor hygiene. People may be more at risk in locations where these factors are common, including: athletic facilities, dormitories, military barracks, correctional facilities, and daycare centers.

MRSA Statistics

Invasive MRSA Statistics

The following is a summary of the data presented in the article “Invasive Methicillin-ResistantStaphylococcus aureus Infections in the United States” Adobe PDF file [PDF – 9 pages] published in the Journal of the American Medical Association 2007;298(15):1763-1771.

The estimated number of people developing a serious MRSA infection (i.e., invasive) in 2005 was about 94,360; this is higher than estimates using other methods.

Approximately 18,650 persons died during a hospital stay related to these serious MRSA infections.

Serious MRSA disease is still predominantly related to exposures to healthcare delivery:

  • About 85% of all invasive MRSA infections were associated with healthcare, and of those, about two-thirds occurred outside of the hospital, while about one third occurred during hospitalization.
  • About 14% of all the infections occurred in persons without obvious exposures to healthcare.

Although the rates of disease varied between the geographically diverse sites participating in the surveillance, overall rates of disease were consistently highest among older persons (age >65), Blacks, and males.

Evaluation of the pathogens causing these infections confirmed that most of the strains associated with these serious MRSA infections were caused by strains traditionally associated with healthcare. However, the strains traditionally associated with transmission in the community are now being identified in healthcare.

Protect yourself through good hygiene.

The key to preventing MRSA infections is for everyone to practice good hygiene:

  1. Keep your hands clean by washing thoroughly with soap and water or using an alcohol-based hand rub.
  2. Keep cuts and scrapes clean and covered with a bandage until healed.
  3. Avoid contact with other people’s wounds or bandages.
  4. Avoid sharing personal items such as towels or razors.

Prevent the spread of MRSA if you have it.

Prevent spreading MRSA skin infections to others by following these steps:

  1. Cover your wound.
    Keep wounds that are draining, or have pus, covered with clean, dry bandages until healed. Follow your healthcare provider’s instructions on proper care of the wound. Pus from infected wounds can contain staph, including MRSA, so keeping the infection covered will help prevent the spread to others. Bandages and tape can be discarded with the regular trash.
  2. Clean your hands.
    You, your family, and others in close contact should wash their hands frequently with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand rub, especially after changing the bandage or touching the infected wound.
  3. Do not share personal items.
    Avoid sharing personal items, such as towels, washcloths, razors, clothing, or uniforms, that may have had contact with the infected wound or bandage. Wash sheets, towels, and clothes that become soiled with water and laundry detergent. Use a dryer to dry clothes completely.
  4. Maintain a clean environment
    Establish cleaning procedures for frequently touched surfaces and surfaces that come into direct contact with your skin.
  5. Talk to your doctor.
    Tell any healthcare providers who treat you that you have or had a staph or MRSA skin infection. There are things that can be done to protect people that carry staph/MRSA from getting an infection or spreading it to others when they are in the hospital or have surgery.

How Does NutraSilver Compare to Traditional Antibiotic MRSA Disease Treatments?

Unlike antibiotics, NutraSilver kills viruses, bacteria and fungal infections. There are no known side effects using NutraSilver other than taking too much too fast (healing crisis). None of the traditional side effects of using traditional antibiotics exists using NutraSilver. NutraSilver can be a safe, effective and comfortable experience eliminating MRSA from the body without allergic reactions or any other life-threatening side effects known to exist using current antibiotics therapies.

Please see our FDA-certified in-vitro lab test.

To better understand how NutraSilver will kill your Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ( MRSA) infection, please read further.



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About CareMan
I am the CareMan, have been for 7 years now. I really do care about YOU and getting YOU back to great, natural health, so long as you have an open mind.

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