Don’t hate yourself for trusting them! One Third of Bottled Water Contains Contaminants

Bottled water lies

Sacramento – Saying consumers should know what they’re drinking, environmentalists and the East Bay Municipal Utility District want bottled water to follow the same disclosure rules as tap water.

Makers of bottled water, which include Pepsi and Coca-Cola, say there is already plenty of disclosure about their water’s contents.

Advocates of two bills introduced in the Legislature say there isn’t nearly enough.

Sacramento – Saying

“People tout bottled water as this pure substance that’s trickling from clear mountain springs when, in fact, that may not be the case,” said Assemblywoman Ellen Corbett, D-San Leandro, author of one of the bills.

“When I pick up bottled water, I want to know it truly is something that’s good for me and better for me than drinking something else,” Corbett said.

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Nearly 70 percent of Californians drink bottled water, which nationwide is a $6 billion industry. And by the end of this year, bottled water will have moved past milk, coffee and beer to become the second most popular beverage behind soft drinks, according to the Beverage Marketing Corp.

Bottled water’s popularity is fuelled in part by suspicions over the quality of tap water.

But Corbett and the backers of her bill say drink no way of knowing whether bottled water is better or worse.

Unlike tap water, bottled water is considered a food product and is subject to the same sanitation and preparation requirements as other food stuffs.

Although often advertising themselves as superior to tap water, bottlers are required in most cases only to meet the same quality standards as tap water.

Of the hundreds of contaminants state and federal regulators measure, bottled water is subject to a higher standard for only two, according to Randy Kanouse, EBMUD’s Sacramento lobbyist.

Bottlers don’t have to create a “consumer confidence” report each year like water agencies do. The reports tell customers what’s in their water. It details levels of contaminants, if any, like lead, aluminium, arsenic and salt.

Corbett’s bill, AB83, and a companion bill, SB50, by Sen. Byron Sher, D- Palo Alto, would impose the same reporting requirement on bottlers.

Bottling plants and water vending machines would be subject to annual inspections. Bottlers, vending machine owners and water haulers would pay an $86 fee to cover the costs of the inspections.

Bottlers say the bills aren’t needed.

“There are already comprehensive, stringent regulations in place at the federal level for quality labeling,” said Stephen Kay, a spokesman for the International Bottled Water Association. “These two proposed bills are proscriptive and redundant.”

Kay also cited a bill signed last year that requires bottlers to include an 800 number, Web site or address on their labels so consumers can get more information.

But Adrianna Quintero, a lobbyist for the Natural Resources Defence Council, says knowing the nutritional facts about water is not enough.

“It’s pointless to tell me water has zero calories and zero carbohydrates,” Quintero said. “Is there arsenic, nitrates, microbiologic contaminants, perchlorate? If these bottlers are doing the right thing, they shouldn’t have a problem telling me about it.”Bottle vs Tap

The Food and Drug Administration needs to tightened its regulations on bottled water after a four-year study by the NRDC found that of 103 brands surveyed, one- third contained levels of contamination.

The NRDC found the contents of one bottle, labeled “Spring Water,” actually came from an industrial parking lot next to a hazardous waste site.

The FDA now insists that bottled water actually come from a spring if the bottler claims it does.

Bottled water sales have been growing at roughly 10 percent each year through the 1990s.

California is by far the biggest guzzler of bottled water, representing about 24 percent of the national market — twice the consumption level of any other state.

It’s attracted the interest of some of the country’s biggest beverage sellers like Pepsi, which created Aquafina bottled water. Coca-Cola created Dasani.

Nestle Waters of North America owns Arrowhead, Calistoga, Poland Spring, Perrier, S. Pellegrino and Vittel.

But water districts like EBMUD aren’t worried.

“Bottled water doesn’t cut into our market share,” said Kanouse. “It’s kind of like conservation — it relieves a small amount of the demand we have.”

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One Third of Bottled Water Contain Contaminants

The best drinking water on the planet


Sacramento – Saying consumers should know what they’re drinking, environmentalists and the East Bay Municipal Utility District want bottled water to follow the same disclosure rules as tap water.

Makers of bottled water, which include Pepsi and Coca-Cola, say there is already plenty of disclosure about their water’s contents.

Advocates of two bills introduced in the Legislature say there isn’t nearly enough.

Sacramento – Saying

“People tout bottled water as this pure substance that’s trickling from clear mountain springs when, in fact, that may not be the case,” said Assemblywoman Ellen Corbett, D-San Leandro, author of one of the bills.

“When I pick up bottled water, I want to know it truly is something that’s good for me and better for me than drinking something else,” Corbett said.

Nearly 70 percent of Californians drink bottled water, which nationwide is a $6 billion industry. And by the end of this year, bottled water will have moved past milk, coffee and beer to become the second most popular beverage behind soft drinks, according to the Beverage Marketing Corp.

Bottled water’s popularity is fuelled in part by suspicions over the quality of tap water.

But Corbett and the backers of her bill say drink no way of knowing whether bottled water is better or worse.

Unlike tap water, bottled water is considered a food product and is subject to the same sanitation and preparation requirements as other food stuffs.

Although often advertising themselves as superior to tap water, bottlers are required in most cases only to meet the same quality standards as tap water.

Of the hundreds of contaminants state and federal regulators measure, bottled water is subject to a higher standard for only two, according to Randy Kanouse, EBMUD’s Sacramento lobbyist.

Bottlers don’t have to create a “consumer confidence” report each year like water agencies do. The reports tell customers what’s in their water. It details levels of contaminants, if any, like lead, aluminium, arsenic and salt.

Corbett’s bill, AB83, and a companion bill, SB50, by Sen. Byron Sher, D- Palo Alto, would impose the same reporting requirement on bottlers.

Bottling plants and water vending machines would be subject to annual inspections. Bottlers, vending machine owners and water haulers would pay an $86 fee to cover the costs of the inspections.

Bottlers say the bills aren’t needed.

“There are already comprehensive, stringent regulations in place at the federal level for quality labeling,” said Stephen Kay, a spokesman for the International Bottled Water Association. “These two proposed bills are proscriptive and redundant.”

Kay also cited a bill signed last year that requires bottlers to include an 800 number, Web site or address on their labels so consumers can get more information.

But Adrianna Quintero, a lobbyist for the Natural Resources Defence Council,

says knowing the nutritional facts about water is not enough.

“It’s pointless to tell me water has zero calories and zero carbohydrates,” Quintero said. “Is there arsenic, nitrates, microbiologic contaminants, perchlorate? If these bottlers are doing the right thing, they shouldn’t have a problem telling me about it.”

The Food and Drug Administration needs to tightened its regulations on bottled water after a four-year study by the NRDC found that of 103 brands surveyed, one- third contained levels of contamination.

The NRDC found the contents of one bottle, labeled “Spring Water,” actually came from an industrial parking lot next to a hazardous waste site.

The FDA now insists that bottled water actually come from a spring if the bottler claims it does.

Bottled water sales have been growing at roughly 10 percent each year through the 1990s.

California is by far the biggest guzzler of bottled water, representing about 24 percent of the national market — twice the consumption level of any other state.

It’s attracted the interest of some of the country’s biggest beverage sellers like Pepsi, which created Aquafina bottled water. Coca-Cola created Dasani.

Nestle Waters of North America owns Arrowhead, Calistoga, Poland Spring, Perrier, S. Pellegrino and Vittel.

But water districts like EBMUD aren’t worried.

“Bottled water doesn’t cut into our market share,” said Kanouse. “It’s kind of like conservation — it relieves a small amount of the demand we have.”

Want the safest drinking water possible?

We have the answer; a natural mineral that kills all water-borne patogens is ready for your use.

Over 300 Pollutants in U.S. Tap Water

Over 300 Pollutants in U.S. Tap Water

Since 2004, testing by water utilities has found 315 pollutants in the tap water Americans drink, according to an Environmental Working Group (EWG) drinking water quality analysis of almost 20 million records obtained from state water officials.

More than half of the chemicals detected are not subject to health or safety regulations and can legally be present in any amount. The federal government does have health guidelines for others, but 49 of these contaminants have been found in one place or another at levels above those guidelines, polluting the tap water for 53.6 million Americans. The government has not set a single new drinking water standard since 2001.

Water utilities spend 19 times more on water treatment chemicals every year than the federal government invests in protecting lakes and rivers from pollution in the first place.

Based on these data, EWG believes the federal government has a responsibility to do a national assessment of drinking water quality. It should establish new safety standards, set priorities for pollution prevention projects, and tell consumers about the full range of pollutants in their water.

Because it has not, EWG launched a 3-year project to create the largest drinking water quality database in existence. This user-friendly, interactive resource covers 48,000 communities in 45 states and the District of Columbia.

Cities with the Best Water

EWG rated big city (population over 250,000) water utilities based on three factors: the total number of chemicals detected since 2004; the percentage of chemicals found of those tested; and the highest average level for an individual pollutant, relative to legal limits or national average amounts, including for the most common pollutants (disinfection byproducts, nitrate and arsenic). [read more on rating methodology]

Since EWG’s tap water database was published in December 2009, we have received new water test results from several utilities. The database and our city-by-city water quality rankings will be updated in the near future.

EWG’s Top-Rated and Lowest-Rated Water Utilities – 2009

TOP RATED WATER UTILITIES  LOWEST RATED WATER UTILITIES
1
Arlington, TX
Arlington Water Utilities
100
Pensacola, FL
Emerald Coast Water Utility
2
Providence, RI
Providence Water
99
Riverside, CA
City of Riverside Public Utilities
3
Fort Worth, TX
Fort Worth Water Department
98
Las Vegas, NV
Las Vegas Valley Water District
4
Charleston, SC
Charleston Water System
97
Riverside County, CA
Eastern Municipal Water District
5
Boston, MA
Massachusetts Water Resources Authority
96
Reno, NV
Truckee Meadows Water Authority
6
Honolulu, HI
Board of Water Supply
(Honolulu/Windward/Pearl Harbor)
95
Houston, TX
City of Houston Public Works
7
Austin, TX
Austin Water Utility
94
Omaha, NE
Metropolitan Utilities District
8
Fairfax County, VA
Fairfax Water
93
North Las Vegas, NV
City of North Las Vegas Utilities Department
9
St. Louis, MO
City of St. Louis Water Division
92
San Diego, CA
San Diego Water Department
10
Minneapolis, MN
City of Minneapolis Water Department
91
Jacksonville, FL
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High Levels of Toxic Industrial Chemicals Contaminate Cats And Dogs

High Levels of Toxic Industrial Chemicals Contaminate Cats And Dogs

Summary and Findings

They are trying their best to warn us.

In the first study of its kind, Environmental Working Group found that American pets are polluted with even higher levels of many of the same synthetic industrial chemicals that researchers have recently found in people, including newborns.

The results show that America’s pets are serving as involuntary sentinels of the widespread chemical contamination that scientists increasingly link to a growing array of health problems across a wide range of animals—wild, domesticated and human.

Detailed findings

Dogs:The 20 dogs tested included 5 mutts or mixes and 15 dogs of 7 different breeds, including a Pug, Great Dane, Dachshund, Great Pyrenees, and others. In the group, 12 dogs were female and 8 male; ages ranged between 6 months and 12 years (average age 6.3 years). The laboratory analyzed composite blood and urine samples collected from the animals. The dogs’ blood and urine was contaminated with 35 chemicals altogether. These included 7 chemicals (20%) with average levels at least 5 times higher than typical levels in people, and another 7 chemicals with average levels up to 5 times amounts found in people. Relative to people, dogs showed high levels of stain- and grease-proof chemicals (perfluorochemicals in the Teflon family), plastics chemicals called phthalates, and fire retardants called PBDEs:

  • Teflon chemicals – Highest levels. Tests showed 6 of 13 perfluorochemicals present in dog blood, with five at levels higher than those in more than 80 percent of people tested nationally, including 2 at levels more than 5 times higher than average amounts in people. Dogs were polluted with 2 chemicals in the Teflon family of stain- and grease-proof coatings (perfluorochemicals) at higher levels than any detected in people in national studies by EWG and CDC (perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA) and perfluorohexanoic sulfonate (PFHxS)). Only PFOA (perfluorooctanoic acid), known as the “Teflon chemical” because it has been used to make Teflon and other non-stick pans, was detected at levels in the range of what is typically found in people (45th percentile) as opposed to far in excess. For dogs likely sources of exposure include food contaminated with PFCs leaching from dog food bag coatings, as well as house dust, and stain-proofed furniture, dog beds, and carpets.

 

  • Toxins in plastic toys and medicines. Dogs were contaminated with breakdown products of four plastic softeners (phthalates) at average levels higher than those in more than 80 percent of Americans tested nationally, at levels ranging between 1.1 and 4.5 times the average concentrations in people. These included breakdown products of DEHP, DBP, and DBzP, which are used in veterinary medicines, plastic containers and toys, shampoos, and a huge range of other consumer products. Six of 7 phthalate breakdown products were found in dogs altogether. These chemicals pose risks for reproductive damage, birth defects, and cancer.

 

  • Fire retardants in bedding, house dust, and food. Dog samples contained 19 different fire retardant chemicals known as PBDEs, or polybrominated diphenyl ethers, of 46 chemicals tested. Compared to people, levels were very elevated for highly brominated forms of these chemicals, with 5 compounds that are octaBDEs, nonaBDEs, and decaBDE found at levels higher than between 97 and 99 percent of people tested nationally, ranging up to 17 times the average amounts in people. PBDEs disrupt the normal functioning of thyroid hormones and pose risks to the brain during development. For dogs, potential sources of exposure include foam furniture and bedding manufactured before 2005, contaminated air and house dust, and food contaminated with PBDEs that pollute the environment, especially seafood.

Cats:Veterinary technicians collected blood and urine samples from 37 cats, which included 13 female and 21 males cats (gender not reported for 3 cats). The group included cats with ages from 9 months to 17 years. The laboratory analyzed blood and urine samples composited from all the animals. The cats’ blood and urine was contaminated with 46 chemicals altogether. These included 25 chemicals (54%) with average levels at least 5 times higher than typical levels in people, and another 18 chemicals (39%) with average levels up to 5 times amounts found in people. Relative to people, cats showed very high levels of neurotoxic fire retardants called PBDEs and methylmercury, a pollutant from coal power plants and a common seafood contaminant.

  • Teflon chemicals. Cats were polluted with 8 of 13 chemicals tested in the Teflon family of stain and grease-proof coatings (perfluorochemicals, or PFCs), including 6 at very high levels, above amounts found in between 89 and 99 percent of people tested in national studies, and 4 found at levels more than 5 times average amounts in people. The Scotchgard chemical PFOS, phased out of use by 3M over health concerns in 2000, was found at markedly low levels in cats, at one-quarter of the levels in dogs and in amounts lower than those found in 91 percent of people tested in national studies. PFOA, the “Teflon chemical”, was detected at levels in the range of what is typically found in people (45th percentile). The skewed profiles of PFC exposures in cats relative to humans, with 6 different PFCs occurring at levels far in excess of those typical in people, suggests that cats may have unique exposures or different metabolic responses compared to people. Likely sources of PFCs in cats include food contaminated with PFCs leaching from food bag coatings, house dust, and stain-proofed furniture, cat beds, and carpets.

 

  • Toxins in plastic toys and medicines. Cats’ samples contained 6 out of 7 breakdown products of five industrial plasticizers called phthalates. Cats were polluted with the breakdown product of DMP (dimethyl phthalate) at an average level higher than amounts in every one of more than 5,500 people tested by CDC. In addition to its use in plastics and other consumer products, DMP is an insect repellant with reported uses in flea and tick collars and veterinary medicines. Cats’ samples contained other phthalate breakdown products at low to moderate levels, in excess of amounts found in between 4 and 76 percent of Americans tested in national studies. Cats can be exposed to phthalates from veterinary medicines, plastic containers and toys, and a huge range of other consumer products. Phthalates raise risks for reproductive damage, birth defects, and cancer.

 

  • Fire retardants in bedding, house dust, and food. Cat samples contained 29 of 46 different fire retardant chemicals known as PBDEs, or polybrominated diphenyl ethers, with 16 found at levels higher than amounts in any of the 100 to 2,000 people tested for these chemicals in national studies. The total concentration of all PBDEs in cats was higher than levels in 98 percent of Americans tested, and 26 of 29 individual PBDE chemicals found were at average levels in excess of what is found in 90 percent of the U.S. population. For cats, potential sources of exposure include foam furniture and bedding manufactured before 2005, contaminated air and house dust, and food contaminated with PBDEs that pollute the environment, especially seafood.

Conclusions

The body burden testing conducted in this investigation is the most expansive ever published for companion animals. The study indicates that cats and dogs are exposed to complex mixtures of industrial chemicals, often at levels far in excess of those found in people. Our pets well may be serving as sentinels for our own health, as they breathe in, ingest or absorb the same chemicals that are in our environments. Exposures that pose risks for pets pose risks for human health as well. A new system of public health protections that required companies to prove chemicals are safe before they are sold would help protect all of us, including the pets we love.

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Bottled water contains disinfection byproducts, fertilizer residue, and pain medication

Bottled water NOT within the safe range

The municipal water sources of the Walmart’s Sam’s Choice and Giant’s Acadia bottled waters were identified through contact with Walmart representatives, their bottled water manufacturer, and city/utility officials; or from the label (Giant). Data on the levels of disinfection byproducts (total trihalomethanes or TTHMs) in these municipal water sources were obtained from Notla Water Authority in Blairsville, Georgia; Las Vegas Valley Water District; and Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission. These data were from tap water tests carried out in 2007, which the water utilities disclosed to their customers in an annual report. For every utility the range of values from lowest to the highest represents the concentrations of TTHMs that were found in the tap water over the course of the year. Notla Water Authority provided a single value for TTHMs, not a range.

The rest ended up in landfills, incinerators, and as trash on land and in streams, rivers, and oceans.

This study did not focus on the environmental impacts of bottled water, but they are striking and have been well publicized. Of the 36 billion bottles sold in 2006, only a fifth were recycled (Doss 2008). The rest ended up in landfills, incinerators, and as trash on land and in streams, rivers, and oceans. Water bottle production in the U.S. uses 1.5 million barrels of oil per every year, according to a U.S. Conference of Mayors’ resolution passed in 2007, enough energy to power 250,000 homes or fuel 100,000 cars for a year (US Mayors 2007). As oil prices are continuing to skyrocket, the direct and indirect costs of making and shipping and landfilling the water bottles continue to rise as well (Gashler 2008, Hauter 2008).

Extracting water for bottling places a strain on rivers, streams, and community drinking water supplies as well. When the water is not bottled from a municipal supply, companies instead draw it from groundwater supplies, rivers, springs or streams. This “water mining,” as it is called, can remove substantial amounts of water that otherwise would have contributed to community water supplies or to the natural flow of streams and rivers (Boldt-Van Rooy 2003, Hyndman 2007, ECONorthwest, 2007).

Recommendations

Currently there is a double standard where tap water suppliers provide information to consumers on contaminants, filtration techniques, and source water; bottled water companies do not. This double standard must be eliminated immediately; Bottled water should conform to the same right-to-know standards as tap water.

To bring bottled water up to the standards of tap water we recommend:

  • Full disclosure of all test results for all contaminants. This must be done in a way that is readily available to the public.
  • Disclosure of all treatment techniques used to purify the water, and:
  • Clear and specific disclosure of the name and location of the source water.

To ensure that public health and the environment are protected, we recommend:

  • Federal, state, and local policymakers must strengthen protections for rivers, streams, and groundwater that serve as America’s drinking water sources. Even though it is not necessarily any healthier, some Americans turn to bottled water in part because they distrust the quality of their tap water. And sometimes this is for good reason. Some drinking water (tap and bottled) is grossly polluted at its source – in rivers, streams, and underground aquifers fouled by decades of wastes that generations of political and business leaders have dismissed, ignored, and left for others to solve. A 2005 EWG study found nearly 300 contaminants in drinking water all across the country. Source water protection programs must be improved, implemented, and enforced nationwide (EWG 2005b). The environmental impacts associated with bottled water production and distribution aggravate the nation’s water quality problems rather than contributing to their solution.
  • Consumers should drink filtered tap water instead of bottled water. Americans pay an average of two-tenths of a cent per gallon to drink water from the tap. A carbon filter at the tap or in a pitcher costs a manageable $0.31 per gallon (12 times lower than the typical cost of bottled water), and removes many of the contaminants found in public tap water supplies.2 A whole-house carbon filter strips out chemicals not only from drinking water, but also from water used in the shower, clothes washer and dishwasher where they can volatilize into the air for families to breathe in. For an average four-person household, the cost for this system is about $0.25 per person per day.3 A single gallon of bottled water costs 15 times this amount.

EWG’s study has revealed that bottled water can contain complex mixtures of industrial chemicals never tested for safety, and may be no cleaner than tap water. Given some bottled water company’s failure to adhere to the industry’s own purity standards, Americans cannot take the quality of bottled water for granted. Indeed, test results like those presented in this study may give many Americans reason enough to reconsider their habit of purchasing bottled water and turn back to the tap.

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Beware; You Are NOT Drinking Safe Water

In general, people love to buy bottled water for several reasons. Some might say the water tastes better. It is cleaner. The bottles are more convenient than cups. It is healthier to drink because there aren’t bacteria in the water, as some worry tap water is unsafe to drink. Bottled water is pure and better for you because it comes from a secret spring of crystal clear waters in some faraway mountain God himself has blessed. The list goes on and on.

But would you still buy bottled water if it wasn’t as clean as you thought?

Because of the increasing popularity of purchasing bottled water, which has doubled in the last decade alone, the bottled water industry earns more than $12 billion by selling approximately 9 billion gallons each year. It has become the second most popular beverage, beaten only by soft drinks. They make a financial killing by selling water, a beverage you could get a lot cheaper, if not for free.

You are basically spending 1,900 times more money for water by buying it in packaged form, and most bottled water is no different than tap water. Sometimes, it is actually worse.

The Environmental Working Group has been on a mission to test various brands of bottled water, and has concluded that many brands often exceed the state’s legal limits of contaminants that are permissible for their product. In a poll taken in 2009, 84 percent of Americans said the availability of clean drinking water is their number one environmental concern and said some sort of action should be taken.

Trace amounts of various contaminants are actually allowed to be in drinking water (both bottled and tap), as long as they do not exceed the legal and health limits. Some include nitrate, arsenic, haloacetic acids, lead, aluminium and trihalomethanes. A few other pollutants commonly found in drinking water include agricultural chemicals and pesticides from fertilizer and manure runoff, and industrial chemicals from products and factory discharge.

What the hell is in this water?

As more testing is done, more contaminants have been discovered that are unregulated but the number of tests producing these results has remained at a steady rate.

There is a bit of an unfair double standard for those in the drinking water industry. Tap water consumers are given the results to contaminant testing conducted annually as part of the United States Environmental Protection Agency, but bottled water companies are not required to share their test results because they follow slightly different guidelines through the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Several brands, such as Wal-Mart’s Sam’s Choice and Giant’s Acadia, sell water that is identical to tap water in many aspects. You are literally buying the same water you would get out of a faucet at home, only oftentimes more polluted.

Bottled water companies essentially use the image of purity that radiates from its label to give the impression that it is purer than anything you will ever drink from the tap. But the rationale goes unjustified for consumers, since these companies do not have to disclose their contaminant testing results.

Approximately 33 percent of all bottled water contains more contaminants than regular tap water. You might as well be drinking out of a hose if you want the same level of purity. In one case, the Natural Resources Defense Council found out the contents of one bottle that claimed to come from “spring water” actually came from an industrial parking lot located next to a hazardous waste site.

Be smart with your health and money. Water is essential for your survival, so make sure you know what you are drinking and where it is from. You can’t always trust a label.

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This is Why Family and Friends Are Dying From eColi – A MUST Read

What is E. coli and Why Does it Matter?

eColi food poisoning in children can be fatal

You can’t hardly turn on the news and not see something about another outbreak of E. coli. Outbreaks happen all the time. But there’s more to that story.

Here we sit all comfortable thinking that the most recent outbreak has no chance of effecting you and me when reality is that E. coli is all over our food and we can’t do much to avoid it.

Millions of people in the USA get some form of eColi (food poisoning) every year.

E. coli is rampant throughout our food supply

I remember when my grandson got food poisoning while on a fishing trip; poor fella was “going” at both ends. I gave him 10 drops of NutraSilver and within an hour he was asking for pizza! Seriously!

And what did you do to get eColi?

All you did was go out to a restaurant with your family and have a nice meal. A few hours later all of you began to have diarrhea and began to vomit. This kind of food poisoning can be fatal.

You go to the emergency room at your local hospital and they determined that you have contracted E. coli, caused by a bacterium that is normally found in the lower intestine that was mistakenly in your meal.

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Confirmed; eColi is in our beef, chicken and pork products

Food-borne illness involving eColi is transmitted by consuming or coming in contact with infected meat, poultry or pork products. It can also be passed by fecal residues on vegetables and from infected individuals that do not properly wash their hands before preparing food. Somehow, animal “poop” got into your meal.

One severe complication associated with E. coli infection is hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The infection produces toxic substances that destroy red blood cells, causing kidney injury. HUS can require intensive care, kidney dialysis, and transfusions.

Our CDC estimates that each year roughly 1 in 6 Americans (or 48 million people) gets sick, 128,000 are hospitalized, and 3,000 die of food-borne diseases like E. coli.

Most outbreaks in the United States have been associated with animal fecal matter or raw or undercooked ground beef, unpasteurized milk, unpasteurized juice and leafy greens (spinach, lettuce, etc.).

Each year in the United States, E. coli infections cause approximately 265,000 illnesses. Approximately 40 percent of these infections are caused by the strain E. coli O157:H7, a strain that is part of the shiga toxin-producing group of E. coli bacteria (STEC). The other 60 percent of E. coli cases are caused by non-0157:H7 shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC).

Good hygiene, especially frequent and thorough hand washing, is important to prevent the spread of the disease, particularly after using the rest room, after changing diapers, after touching animals and before eating, drinking or preparing food.

Any child with diarrhea or bloody diarrhea may have E.coli infection. Since STEC can be easily transmitted, parents should not send sick children to day care or to school. Day care centers and schools should send sick children home to avoid person-to-person spread, especially among diapered children.

E. Coli That Cause Urinary Tract Infections are Now Resistant to Antibiotics

eColi bacteria

Thanks to antibiotics, we tend to think of urinary tract infections as no big deal. Pop some cipro, and you’re done. A good thing, too—if the E. coli that usually cause UTIs crawl up the urinary tract, they can cause kidney failure and fatal blood poisoning.

But antibiotics may not be saving us from UTIs for very much longer.

Scientists tracking UTIs from 2000 to 2010 found a dramatic uptick in cases caused by E. coli that do not respond to the drugs that are our first line of defense. In examining more than 12 million urine analyses from that period, they found that cases caused by E. coli resistant to ciprofloxacin grew five-fold, from 3% to 17.1% of cases. And E. coli resistant to the drug trimethoprim-sulfame-thoxazole jumped from 17.9% to 24.2%. These are two of the most commonly prescribed antibiotics used to treat UTIs. When they are not effective, doctors must turn to more toxic drugs, and the more those drugs are used, the less effective they in turn become. When those drugs stop working, doctors will be left with a drastically reduced toolkit with which to fight infection. But you have access to NutraSilver, a natural mineral, that is proven to kill eColi in FDA-certified dependent lab tests.

Might a natural approach to eColi interest you?

In FDA/ISO-certified in-vitro lab tests, NutraSilver decimated a colony of 8.2 billion cells of eColi in 30 minutes, killing 99.999%.  Dr. Micheal Sinclair, CEO of MicroCheck labs, stated “The NutraSilver product at 3 drops in one liter of water is extremely effective against these water-borne bacterial pathogens killing 99.999% of the organisms after only 30 minutes of contact time.”

We invite you to try NutraSilver, a natural antibiotic, and experience the rapid healing, increase in energy and elimination of brain fog.

How to Survive When There is No Safe Drinking Water

Water means life!

We can’t live without it. Not for long – only a few days, at most one week. In fact, water is the one thing that we need the most, to survive. 

The American Red Cross advises to use bleach to purify your drinking water.  What they fail to tell you is that bleach is a toxic poison, not really your best choice!

Far too often, survival minded ‘preppers’ think of and concentrate on storing extra food, with lesser regard for storing water. For some reason, there is an underlying assumption that obtaining water during an emergency or disaster will not be a problem. For some, this may be true, especially if they live right next to a plentiful source of water. But for those that rely on a steady supply of water from their faucet, think again.

Without electricity, most homes will quickly lose their water pressure as municipal pumps will be unable to supply. Don’t count on municipal generators to keep on pumping your water or to be in every pump location where they need to be.

The general rule for storing water for an emergency or disaster is 1 gallon per person per day.

There are variations to this generality, ranging from a half gallon to as much as 3 gallons per person per day because there are other uses for water besides just drinking.

A problem that you will encounter during an emergency or disaster is not only obtaining water to drink, but treating it to make the water safe to drink.

Boil water, if you can…

A best way to treat water for drinking is to boil it first. Well, almost boiling… you don’t actually have to heat water all the way to boiling to rid it of microorganisms.

According to the Wilderness Medical Society, water temperatures above 160° F (70° C) kill all pathogens within 30 minutes and above 185° F (85° C) within a few minutes. So in the time it takes for the water to reach the boiling point (212° F or 100° C) from 160° F (70° C), all pathogens will be killed, even at high altitude. To be extra safe, let the water boil rapidly for one minute, especially at higher altitudes since water boils at a lower temperature.

If boiling is not possible, or to add a layer of protection after boiling (after cool down), another very effective way to make water safe to drink is to add a specific amount of household bleach. Bleach contains about 5 to 6 percent chlorine, which will disinfect the water if added in the right amount. First things first. If the water is cloudy and contains sediment, it should be strained through a filter by using a cloth or coffee filter (use your common sense here with whatever is available). Of course if you have a “real” water filter with you, you’re safe to begin with.

How to purify water with Bleach, a TOXIC POISON!

According to the American Red Cross,

  • Use regular liquid bleach (any brand). The only active ingredient should be sodium hypochlorite (concentration 5.25 – 6 percent). If you also see sodium hydroxide on the ingredient list, it is apparently OK and safe. Do not use bleach that contain soaps, perfumes, or dyes. Be sure to read the label.
  • Add 16 drops (basically, one-eighth US teaspoon) of regular liquid bleach per one gallon of water. Use 8 drops if using a 2-liter bottle. Get a dropper!
  • Mix thoroughly and let stand for 30 minutes.
  • Then, smell the water. If the water has a faint smell of chlorine, then it is OK to use. If you cannot detect any chlorine odor, add another 16 drops of regular liquid bleach (8 drops for 2-liter bottle). Let stand, and smell it again. If you still cannot smell chlorine, discard it and find another water source.

Water Purification, THE safe way!

NutraSilver is a safe, natural way to purify your drinking water. NutraSilver® is inexpensive and highly portable—one 30ml bottle contains enough drops to purify approximately 1,200 liters of germ-laden water drinking water. Third-world countries use colloidal silver to purify their drinking water and reduce microbial infection risks by washing their fruits and vegetables with a colloidal silver rinse. FDA-certified independent lab tests prove NutraSilver has ZERO Toxicity!

NutraSilver is used as a water purification system by backpackers, international travelers, soldiers and anyone who must have drinking water that is completely purified and safe to drink. Sold globally for over 15 years, NutraSilver® has saved countless lives in third-world countries.

Order today and find out how well NutraSilver® works for water purification. We offer a 60-day money-back guarantee.

Drinking Water; A MEDICAL TIME BOMB

Pathogenic Drinking Water: Closer Than You Think…

Recent research studies have identified a wide range of microbial problem areas including:

  • community drinking water supplies
  • delivered and store-bought bottled water
  • water coolers
  •  water lines in dental offices
  • shower heads
  • air conditioning systems
  • home plumbing systems
  • and even under-sink reverse osmosis water treatment systems purchased, ironically, for the removal of water contaminants

SOURCES OF MICROBIAL CONTAMINATION:

The natural question is: where are these pathogens coming from? Part of the answer may lie in the findings of recent studies conducted in dental offices where a wide variety of pathogen microbes were found at extraordinary levels in dental unit water lines.

Recently, a well-known California dentist died from Legionella pneumophilia which was traced to the water coming from the dental instrument water lines in his office. A fatal case of endocarditis was recently traced to contamination of dental water lines encountered during a simple teeth cleaning operation.

What Solutions Work in Your Home?

Not trusting tap or bottled water, many have turned to a variety of home water treatment systems. Unfortunately, most of these popular systems aren’t up to the task of dealing with these microbial problems.

Reverse osmosis systems have long been known to be incapable of dealing with bacterial problems. Indeed, recent Canadian studies have shown that they quickly become a massive breeding ground for pathogens which have been directly correlated with illnesses in most homes tested.

Carbon filtration, including those variations are used to allegedly deal with biological problems are clearly inadequate solutions—and, as noted over the years, carbon filters have their own propensity for developing heavy biological loadings.

Ozone treatment and ultraviolet irradiation can have very powerful disinfecting efficacy, however it is difficult to achieve this result close to the point of use, and this is the critical aspect of utility in dealing with the microbial contamination of water vessels and water lines used by consumers.

Steam distillation provides a secure approach to microbiological decontamination leading to production of safe, sterile drinking water and as implied on the NBC Dateline series, the boiling/steaming aspect of distillation may be the only practical and effective technique available to the homeowner. Until now.

We need to remember that the “carcasses” of bacteria contain toxic substances and pyrogens. So the physical removal of microbes, dead or alive, at the point of use through distillation techniques or contemporary micro filtration technology is likely to have an important role in addressing the problem in many circumstances, like the dental water lines, for example.

New laboratory techniques and systems based on an assessment of total bacterial contamination and some evaluation of disease-causing potential are needed, and fortunately are being developed. There is no need to wait; we have them for you right now!

These methods, combined with techniques emerging from molecular biology will provide the basis for more judicious selection of suitable point-of-use prevention technologies, both in the U.S. and overseas. The end result will be to reduce the impact of waterborne pathogens on the public’s health–and to rebuild the consumer’s confidence in the purity of the water they drink.

Point-of-use Water Purification

NutraSilver is a safe, natural way to purify water. NutraSilver® is inexpensive and highly portable—one 30ml bottle contains enough drops to purify approximately 1,200 liters of germ-laden water drinking water. Third-world countries use colloidal silver to purify their drinking water and reduce microbial infection risks by washing their fruits and vegetables with a colloidal silver rinse. Carry NutraSilver in your pocket or purse.

NutraSilver is used as a water purifier by backpackers, international travelers, soldiers and anyone who must have drinking water that is completely safe to drink. FDA-certified independent in-vitro lab testing proves there is zero toxicity in NutraSilver and that it kills the most dangerous water-born pathogens known quickly and inexpensively.

Order today and find out how well NutraSilver® works for water purification. We are so certain that you will love NutraSilver, we offer a 60-day money-back guarantee.

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